Serving the Invisible (guest post by Alene Snodgrass)

Serving the Invisible

As I reach out to those down-and-out in the inner city where I live, I’m always taken back by how many of them feel invisible.

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A Tail of Two Goats (Guest Post by Kati Rose Johnston)

Today, I’d like to share a post co-written by my dear friend Kati Rose (you can check out her blog here).  It was written during her study at School of the Bible last year, and since we are again studying Leviticus, I thought it would be appropriate to revisit it, and share it with a new audience.

We were given an assignment to tell the events of Leviticus 16 (The Day of Atonement) in story form.

Behold, I give you:
A Tail of Two Goats By John Martindale, Rachel Kelley, & KatiRose Johnston
*Note: this story may be a bit irreverent at times, but we believe in a God who laughs 🙂

Once upon a time, in a land sort of far away, there lived two goats: Mahli and Mushi. These were no ordinary goats, pecked at by chickens or chased by the dogs, they were pampered goats, who oft lunched on their master Aaron’s linen underwear.

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The Best Missions Advice I Ever Received: Be Who God Made You To Be (guest post by Tyler Hess)

(Tyler Hess blogs about practical and spiritual applications of faith at undistractedchristian and you can follow him on twitterIf you want to write a guest post for missionsmusings, here’s how.)

Two years ago my wife and I went on what might be the riskiest adventure of our lives.

We gave up a fairly comfortable, boring life, in southern California to go minister at a church in the semi-foreign island of Kauia, Hawaii.

I know, I know, it is one of the United States, but it’s a different culture than what we were used to and for the first time in my life I was a minority.

We both grew up in church and we went to Bible college together, so we have heard all kinds of stories about different pastors, missionaries and evangelists doing crazy awesome things from town to town and nation to nation.

What we hadn’t heard until right before we left is the one thing that we needed to hear, which was that we didn’t have to be what other people expected us to be, that we didn’t need to pretend that we were something else entirely.

And He Himself gave some to be apostles, some prophets, some evangelists, and some pastors and teachers,

for the equipping of the saints for the work of ministry, for the edifying of the body of Christ…

Eph 4: 11-12

My wife and I aren’t exactly what you would call “extroverts”.

We’re just quiet people, who like to listen before speaking and who care about getting to know people.

When people think about being a successful missionary, they think about how many people you lead to Christ, about great stories of evangelism and miracles along the way.

They don’t think about getting to know people and encouraging believers in the faith. They don’t think about getting a job and witnessing to co-workers while earning a normal paycheck, just like at home.

The greatest bit of wisdom that I can pass along to any hopeful or present missionaries is that whoever you are at home, that is who you should be when you go out from there, whatever that may be.

Do you know who you are in Christ?

Guest post: A Journal Junkie’s Guide to Journaling

Just a quick “public service announcement” to let you know that today I posted my very first guest post, over on Lindsay Morelli’s blog.  It is on the subject of journaling, and if you feel like having a look, you can see it here.

 

Regular blogging will resume later this evening.

 

This concludes my public service announcement.  😉

A Few Thoughts on Missions (guest post by Josh Heyward)

(Today I’m featuring the first ever guest post on missionsmusings.com, written by Josh Heyward.  You can also check out his blog or look him up on twitter.  If you want to write a guest post for missionsmusings, here’s how.)    

Missions. Many different things come to mind with this one word—a straw hut overseas, a spring break mission trip, inner city ministry, caring for the poor, etc. The fact of the matter is that the word “missions” means something different to each individual.  Some relate very well to this term being that they are totally comfortable with being in an unfamiliar environment in order to serve other people, yet others run from the idea being that they fear being called to live in that straw hut overseas.  Whatever the case, each individual’s understanding is different.  I would, however like to discuss two key elements of missions to hopefully clear the muddy waters of such a diverse and crucial idea.

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